Posts Tagged ‘myc4’

MYC4 profile Regina Mumbi Njoroge

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009
Kenya

Regina Mumbi owns a boutique where she sells new cloths for both men and ladies. She would like a loan to expand her business by adding more stock in her boutique.
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Can Kiva cope with the demand ?

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

As per my previous post it looks like Kiva is having some troubles in coping with demand.  This article confirms their plan to launch micro loans in the U.S.

In some recent enquiries I have discovered that some MFIs are not entirely pleased with Kiva’s system. Why so if the money is lent at 0% interest rate?

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MYC4 profile Joyce Nakirijja

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009
Uganda

Joyce owns a retail shop where she sells mainly household items. She would like to get a second loan so that she can purchase more commodities. This will boost both her sales and monthly turnover.
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MYC4 profile Menya Haruna

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009
Uganda

Menya Haruna deals in grain milling, he buys maize grain from local buyers and mills it to produce flour. He is seeking for a loan to boost his working capital in the business.
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MYC4 profile Grace Odong

Monday, March 23rd, 2009
Uganda

Grace owns a mini supermarket. She would like to restock her shop with more commodities. This will enable her to meet the demands of her clients hence boosting her sales.
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MYC4 experiment

Sunday, March 22nd, 2009

To continue my experiment I have made the following five bids on myc4.com

I) Godfry, Mechanical Services, Uganda
II) Tropical Diagnostic, Ghana

III)Annet, Veterinary Shop, Uganda
IV) Joyce, Retail Store, Uganda
V) Asuma, Tailoring, Uganda

Feel free to click on the links to see the whole project.

On MyC4 you act as a real microlender meaning:

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MYC4 profile Hadijah Asuman

Sunday, March 22nd, 2009
Uganda

Hadijah owns and runs a tailoring business. She wants another loan so that she purchases more fabric and sewing machines. She will then have the capacity to serve more clients thus increasing her monthly turnover.
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MYC4 profile TROPICAL DIAGNOSTICS SUPPLIES

Sunday, March 22nd, 2009
Ghana

Tropical Diagnostic, trades in laboratory reagents, chemicals and equipments. The company sells to private and public laboratories, hospitals and clinics. Tropical Diagnostics is requesting for €2,892 to improve and expand the business operations.
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MYC4 profile Mubiru Annet

Sunday, March 22nd, 2009
Uganda

Mubiru Annet wants to acquire a second loan from MYC4. She deals in selling of veterinary medicine, food and others. She is seeking for a loan to increase her working capital and expand her business further to meet her customers needs.
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microcredit online platforms: my experience

Saturday, March 21st, 2009

In the past few days I have tested two lending platforms. Here are my findings:

MyC4

I had initially the wrong impression about this platform. I did change my mind after reviewing this

The idea is to allow lenders to charge an interest rate (and perhaps make a profit) in the process. The only difficulty is that the loan is then transferred in local currency and an investor should get familiar with the inflation rate/currency depreciation before bidding. Of course you can bid for a lower interest rate but you will then have an higher chance to loose money. The whole process is not sugar coated in the sense that, an investor, has the chance to experience the real interest rate charged to the borrower + the default rate. All this happens behind Kiva too but in MyC4 you do see it directly. It makes of you a micro banker with some of the relevant decision making issues (how much to charge, selecting the clients, reviewing collaterals).

All in all it requires a bit more time than Kiva but it is a totally different concept. It focuses solely on Africa. My suggestion is to start small (20-50 Euro) and focus on MFIs with low delinquency rates.

Veecus
I am not sure about this provider. They work only with 1 MFI from Cameroon. Some of the loans appear to be out of proportion (800-1000 Euro? it does sound out of proportion) and their profit model doesn’t seem to be very transparent “Veecus gets revenue from membership fees paid by Veecus lenders on the very first loan, and a volume-based fee paid by microfinance institutions once they have received funds for microentrepreneurs’ projects.”

How high is the fee?

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